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The Welcome Table of Black Mountain

The Welcome Table of Black Mountain is a non-profit (501.3.c) organization that is celebrating its one-year of providing an opportunity for individuals in the community for fellowship and a nutritious lunch. Over the year we have served over 7000 individuals using the services of volunteers, who help prepare the meal on Tuesdays and help with set up and serving on Wednesdays. We operate out of the St. James Episcopal Church, which donated the space and has been a major supporter of the program. The program operates totally on donations and grants received from individuals and community agencies in the community, and operates under the leadership of Master Chef, John Crognale.

 

The program that has been developed is based on strong beliefs that are as follows:

  1. We will serve only high quality nutritional food, with a strong emphasis on fresh vegetables, a healthy choice of fresh salads, and quality entrees, all made by the Chef and volunteers in the kitchen.
  2. We will not charge for any meal, and allow for contributions in which those that can afford, will contribute for those who cannot pay, with no distinguish made for either group
  3. We will provide a meal as a tool for socialization and companionship, in which people of all ages and incomes can sit together and share a common time and meal together. This has included senior citizens, community leaders, local police and firemen, young adults and young children.
  4. We will provide an opportunity for other agencies to provide volunteers as part of community service to come to help with serving and cleaning up during the lunch.
  5. We will continue to operate as a non-profit and all funds will be used for the purchase of food, as volunteers will do all labor.
  6. We will continue to receive desserts from the many volunteers and the local churches in the community
  7. We will develop a model of how this program can be duplicated throughout the State, by keeping records of activities, numbers served, contributions received, menus, volunteer recruitment and schedules, and other suggestions which would help other communities meet the needs of their local population.

The Welcome Table is always in need of more volunteers and funds. If you have any questions or would like to help support our work, please call me,  Dr. John DeWitt at 828-357-8081 or email at drjohndewitt@me.com.

- You know you're a Foodie when:

  • Your Inbox has newsletters from 3 or more kitchen web sites a day.
  • You give directions using restaurants as landmarks.
  • You create a pot of soup and a batch of pesto before feeding yourself breakfast by 9 am.
  • You pick clothing colors based on favorite foods (granny smith apples, eggplant).
  • Your pass words to bank, computer and the like are food related.
  • You watch more than two food related shows in a day.
  • Your bed time reading, bath room reading ... are all food related including mystery novels like "The Butter Did It."
  • More than half of the books in your home are cookbooks.

- Deconstruction or Construction ... How do you think in the kitchen?

Do you spend a lot of time getting a recipe exactly right or do you consider "what if I substitute this for that?"  I am working my way through "The Artist's Way at Work - Riding the Dragon - Twelve Weeks to Creative Freedom."  In the midst of week seven we read about how we (Americans) are taught the art of  deconstructive, critical thinking.  Looking at what is wrong with vs looking at what is or isn't possible.  I got to wondering how do I apply deconstructive thinking in my cooking.

 

Like most cooks I think about what I didn't do correctly.  I am hyper critical of how a dish came out.  I was taught by my mother to follow the recipe exactly.  This is a wise habit when baking but for general cooking not necessarily. It may not look just like the picture in the cook book, but it taste just as yummy.  I confess, there have been some really awful kitchen disasters.  I don't remember exactly what I did wrong, but the dogs turned up their noses and walked away.

 

Go ahead.  Give yourself permission to consider ... get out a piece of paper and answer the following:

  • What do I think I should cook, what do I feel like cooking, what do I wish I would/could cook,  if it were not impossible I would make  _____ tonight? 
  • What did your answers reveal? 

Go ahead, try out one of your ideas.   There was a first time for having pineapple and chicken as a pizza topping or putting mint in your pesto recipe.    What did you come up with?

- Food Funny

 

- Some Food History

"Green Immigrants" by Claire S. Haughton recounts the history of how and why many plants came to the United States.  Kale for example is "leaf cabbages, cabbages that won't head."  Its "origin is Asia Minor" grown by Greeks and Romans, later the Celts.  Kale was first planted in the United States in 1540 by Jacques Cartier, a French explorer.  It was a staple of the southern garden. Long cold nights created the Head cabbage.  It stored well and  thrived in the North while headless thrived in the South. 

 

The oldest form of kale is cauliflower which originated in Turkey.  Broccoli owes its origins  to kale and the horticulture of the Italians of the Middle Ages. Brussel sprouts are also derived from kale as well compliments of the Belgiums.  Who knew!  More next month.

In This Issue:

- You know you're a Foodie when:

- Deconstruction or Construction ... How do you think in the kitchen?

- Food Funny

- Some Food History

- Find My Gluten Free Goodies at one of these locations near you:

- Planning a Conference, Dinner or Office Party?

- First Dates

- Recommended Website Reading

Please share my newsletter with your family and friends with the "Send to a Friend" link above this newsletter or in the footer and you are welcome to share this with your Facebook friends - just click the link provided in the footer!

 

Visit my website: True Color Cooking for more information.

 

 

 

Happy Eating and Cooking!

Harriette Bugel

Chef for Hire

- Find My Gluten Free Goodies at one of these locations near you:

  • Hickory Nut Gap Farm, Fairview, NC
  • Trout Lilly Natural Grocery Store, Fairview, NC
  • Montford Books, Asheville, NC
  • Black Mountain Farmers Market, Black Mountain, NC

Another unsolicited review:

 

"Harriette, your Gluten Free Breakfast Bars are a fantastic way to start the day - or as a healthy snack anytime-delicious and filling. My daughter would rather have these than candy now. Thank you for all you do to help people eat healthy and delicious food!" Amanda Jones

- Planning a Conference, Dinner or Office Party?

Whatever the reason to gather and eat well, let me help with this

Special Offer!

ONE HOUR of FREE Labor.

 

BOOK NOW To Reserve Your Date!

 

What a deal.  This one time offer can be used at your discretion.

 

Contact Me Today For More Information:

truecolorcooking@gmail.com

- First Dates

 

Coupling leftover singles can be fun and satisfying.  Simple soups are a great first date for many leftover single items.    I usually start with olive oil, onions, garlic and mushroom in a cast iron pot.  If it's a deep skillet call it stew.  If it's a dutch oven call it soup. Bits of vegetables and nuts or that last gulp of wine can give the soup body and flavor.  Left over beef, chicken, lamb, turkey can be chunked. Toss it right on in there.  A dash of salt, can of vegetable broth and a slow simmer will have a pot of soup going in no time.

- Recommended Website Reading

Karina is the Gluten Free Goddess. Click here to read her blog; the Gluten Free Goddess

True Color Cooking • P O Box 258 • Asheville, NC 28802
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