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Information Session

Tuesday, March 29th

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

 

More Information


Please contact SIRRI

at (480) 777-7075 or e-mail

to reserve your seat(s).


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please call for a free

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Gluten-Free & Dairy-Free Recipe: Irish Soda Bread 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Gluten-Free and Dairy Free Irish Soda Bread is adapted from a recipe by Connie Sarros, "Leprechaun Bread" which appears in her cookbook, Wheat-Free, Gluten-Free, Reduced-Calorie Cookbook. This recipe makes a light, classic loaf of Irish Soda Bread with terrific flavor and texture. If you tolerate dairy foods and can find it, serve Gluten-Free Irish Soda Bread with Kerry Gold butter- the rich, deep yellow, super creamy butter from Ireland.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes 

Serves 6

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups gluten-free all purpose flour mix (Bob's Red Mill Pizza Crust Mix)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon honey OR 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cold dairy-free butter substitute, cut in small pieces (see note)
  • 1/2 cup currants OR raisins
  • 2 large, lightly beaten eggs
  • 1 cup minus 1 tablespoon light, canned coconut milk (see note)
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon gluten-free mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • Extra gluten-free flour to shape dough
  • Extra coconut milk to brush on loaf before baking
  • Note: If you include dairy foods in your diet, use unsalted butter instead of dairy-free butter substitute and substitute buttermilk for the coconut milk. If using buttermilk, reduce the amount of apple cider vinegar from 1 tablespoon to 1 teaspoon.

Preparation:


Preheat oven to 375° F / 190° C

 

Line a small baking sheet with parchment paper or lightly grease.

 

Note: The key to preventing stickiness while shaping the bread loaf is to liberally flour a large cutting board (work surface) with gluten-free flour mix or white rice flour. Keep hands and loaf lightly floured while shaping!

  1. Sift all dry ingredients EXCEPT baking soda. Pour into a medium mixing bowl.
  2. Use hands to work cold butter substitute into flour mixture. Add currants.
  3. Add cider vinegar to coconut milk and pour into dry ingredients. Mix with an electric mixer to thoroughly blend.
  4. Add mayonnaise and lightly beaten eggs and mix just until combined. Add baking soda and mix to combine.
  5. Turn the thick, sticky batter onto a floured cutting board and shape the loaf into a round ball, about 6 inches in diameter.
  6. Use a sharp knife to cut an "X" on the top of loaf.
  7. Brush with coconut milk and allow to rest for 10 minutes. Brush with coconut milk again.
  8. Bake in preheated oven for 35 to 45 minutes or until the loaf is golden and done.
  9. Serve warm
Tips: Bob's Red Mill Pizza Crust Mix was used to make this recipe. It worked beautifully and is both gluten and dairy free. This product contains whole grain brown rice, potato starch, whole grain millet flour, whole grain sorghum flour, tapioca flour, potato flour, evaporated cane juice, xanthan gum, sea salt and guar gum. Don't use the package of yeast that is in the bag for this recipe!

 

Reminder: Always make sure your work surfaces, utensils, pans and tools are free of gluten. Always read product labels. Manufacturers can change product formulations without notice. When in doubt, do not buy or use a product before contacting the manufacturer for verification that the product is free of gluten.

Facts about St. Patrick's Day Holiday

 

  • St. Patrick’s Day is observed on March 17

    because that is the feast day of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. It is believed that he died on March 17 in the year 461 AD. It is also a worldwide celebration of Irish culture and history. St. Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, and a provincial holiday in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

     
  • In Ireland on St. Patrick’s Day

    people traditionally wear a small bunch of shamrocks on their jackets or caps. Children wear orange, white and green badges, and women and girls wear green ribbons in their hair.

     
  • Many cities have a St. Patrick’s Day parade.

    Dublin, the capital of Ireland, has a huge St. Patrick’s Day festival from March 15-19, that features a parade, family carnivals, treasure hunt, dance, theatre and more. In North American, parades are often held on the Sunday before March 17. Some paint the yellow street lines green for the day! In Chicago, the Chicago River is dyed green with a special dye that only lasts a few hours. There has been a St. Patrick’s Day parade in Boston, Massachusetts since 1737. Montreal is home to Canada’s longest running St. Patrick’s Day parade, which began in 1824.

Facts about Saint Patrick

  • St. Patrick was born in 385 AD

    somewhere along the west coast of Britain, possibly in the Welsh town of Banwen. At age 16, he was captured and sold into slavery to a sheep farmer. He escaped when he was 22 and spent the next 12 years in a monastery. In his 30s he returned to Ireland as a Christian missionary. He died at Saul in 461 AD and is buried at Downpatrick.

Facts about the Irish

  • 34 million Americans have Irish ancestry

    - according to the 2003 US Census. That’s almost nine times the population of Ireland, which has 4.1 million people.

  • Some American towns have “Irish” names. You could visit: Mount Gay-Shamrock, West Virginia; Shamrock Lakes, Indiana; Shamrock, Oklahoma; Shamrock, Texas; Dublin, California and Dublin, Ohio.

  • The harp is the symbol of Ireland.

    The color green is also commonly associated with Ireland, also known as “the Emerald Isle.”

  • The Irish flag is green, white and orange.

    The green symbolizes the people of the south, and orange, the people of the north. White represents the peace that brings them together as a nation.

  • The name “lephrechaun” has several origins. It could be from the Irish Gaelic word “leipreachan,” which means “a kind of aqueous sprite.” Or, it could be from “leath bhrogan,” which means “shoemaker.”

Facts about Clovers

  • According to the Guinness Book of World Records: the highest number of leaves found on a clover is 14!
  • One estimate suggests

    that there are about 10 000 regular three-leaf clovers for every lucky four-leaf clover.

         
  • Legend says that each leaf of the clover means something: the first is for hope, the second for faith, the third for love and the fourth for luck.

 

 

 

 

 

Moderate Sleep Loss Impairs Vigilance and Sustained Attention in Children With ADHD

A new study in the March 1 issue of the journal SLEEP indicates that the ability of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder to remain vigilant and attentive deteriorated significantly after losing less than one hour of nightly sleep for a week. The study suggests that even moderate reductions in sleep duration can affect neurobehavioral functioning, which may have a negative impact on the academic performance of children with ADHD.

 

Results of multivariate analyses of variance show that after mean nightly sleep loss of about 55 minutes for six nights, the performance of children with ADHD on a neurobehavioral test deteriorated from the subclinical range to the clinical range of inattention on four of six measures, including omission errors (missed targets) and reaction time. Children with ADHD generally committed more omission errors than controls. Although the performance of children in the control group also deteriorated after mean nightly sleep loss of 34 minutes for six nights, it did not reach a clinical level of inattention on any of the six measures.

 

"Moderate sleep restriction leads to a detectable negative impact on the neurobehavioral functioning of children with ADHD and healthy controls, leading to a clinical level of impairment in children with ADHD," said lead author and principal investigator Reut Gruber, PhD, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at McGill University and director of the Attention, Behavior and Sleep Laboratory at Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal, Québec.

The National Institute of Mental Health reports that ADHD is one of the most common childhood disorders and is characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. To be diagnosed with the disorder, a child must have symptoms for 6 months or more and to a degree that is greater than other children of the same age.

 

The study involved 43 children, 11 with ADHD and 32 controls. They had a mean age of about 9 years. After their baseline sleep was monitored for six nights, children were asked to eliminate one hour of nightly sleep for six consecutive nights by going to sleep one hour later than usual.

 

During the baseline and experimental periods, sleep was monitored at home using an actigraph, a computerized device that looks like a wristwatch. Mean nightly sleep time dropped from 487.75 minutes at baseline to 433.07 minutes for the ADHD group, and from 478.81 minutes at baseline to 444.67 minutes for the control group.

 

"The reduction in sleep duration in our study was modest and similar to the sleep deprivation that might occur in daily life," Gruber said. "Thus, even small changes in dinner time, computer time, or staying up to do homework could result in poorer neurobehavioral functioning the following day and affect sustained attention and vigilance, which are essential for optimal academic performance."

 

Neurobehavioral functioning was measured with the Continuous Performance Test at the end of the baseline period and following the experimental period of sleep loss. The CPT is a standardized, computer-administered test that takes about 15 minutes to complete. Single letters are presented on a computer screen at three different rates, requiring participants to press a button in response to every signal except the target signal. According to the authors, in recent years the CPT increasingly has been included in the basic neurobehavioral battery administered for ADHD evaluation.

 

Gruber added that the problem of inadequate sleep in students needs to be prioritized and addressed by the educational system.

 

"An important implication of the present study is that investments in programs that aim to decrease sleep deprivation may lead to improvements in neurobehavioral functioning and academic performance," she said.

Currently she and her research team are implementing the "Sleep for Success" program in elementary schools in Québec. The program provides tools to help classroom teachers, students and parents reduce sleep deprivation in children and adolescents.

 

The study was supported by the Canadi­an Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec (FRSQ).

 

American Academy of Sleep Medicine (2011, March 4). Moderate sleep loss impairs vigilance and sustained attention in children with ADHD. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 16, 2011, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2011/03/110301111247.htm

Our Brain's Remarkable Plasticity  

 

by Pamela Nevills, EdD 

BrainWare Bulletin - March 2011


We can better understand our human brain and its ability to learn and remember through neurophysiology.  This field of study gives us insights into the workings of the brain’s structures, which cooperate together as complex thinking units.  Humans continually receive what initially appear as senseless signals from the environment.  As the brain connects new information to background information by searching previous memories and understandings, learners can make sense of new experiences and environmental signals as they continue to learn throughout life.


What would our lives would be like if the human brain stopped changing when we reached adulthood?  We would not be able to meet new friends, remember events from day to day, or even know who we are as we change with age.  Our 30,000 genes, which are individually assigned the awesome responsibility to develop the human brain beginning at conception, basically finish their job when we reach the end of adolescence.  The brain’s orders for building, designing, and organizing the brain are complete.  However, our brains continue to learn and change at the neuron and synapse levels throughout life.  This remarkable feature allows fully developed adult brains to continue learning and responding to new information and changes throughout all our years.


By the end of adolescence the human brain is basically organized and connected with the foundation and framework for how the brain will learn for the rest of the human life.  From that time the brain’s plasticity is more limited as the brain adds depth of connections to enrich memory for life’s experiences.  However, it continues to respond to the ever-changing environmental with an elaborate sorting, filing, and categorization system.  Adults are able to learn new ideas, concepts, or skills with ease when they connect the new learning to information they have previously mastered.  Adult brains may be less plastic than children’s brains, but be assured they are more efficient and every bit as purposeful. 


 Pamela Nevills is author of Build the Brain to Read, Grades 4 -12, and can be contacted at pamelanevills@pamelanevills.com

 

Did You Know?

You may have been a client prior to SIRRI offering these services for both children & adults:

  • Neurofeedback & Biofeedback
  • qEEG / Brain Mapping
  • Cognitive Retraining: memory, processing & problem solving skills
  • Attention, Concentration & Focus Training
  • Reading Development: fluency & comprehension
  • Balance, Coordination & Motor Planning Development
  • Stress & Anxiety Management
  • IEP Advocacy

Upcoming 2011 Session Dates

for the Sensory Learning Program:

 

Monday March 28 through Friday April 8

Monday April 11 through Friday April 22

Monday May 16 through Friday May 27

Monday June 6 through Friday June 17

Monday June 18 through Friday July 1


SIRRI Arizona • 4515 S. McClintock Drive, Suite 208 • Tempe, AZ 85282
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