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In this issue:

2012 Field School Results

Joara Pottery Festival

Table Rock Middle School field trip

Camp Lake James

Warren Wilson College

2012 Field School Results

The annual Field School at the Berry Archaeological Site will begin June 2nd, continuing on with work from last year. Last summer, students and faculty targeted two areas of the Berry site for investigation.  The first was an open plaza where earlier excavations revealed interesting features and postholes, but lack of time prevented further exploration. Students excavated one large feature and a number of postholes in this plaza area, documenting a previously unrecognized pattern of relatively large, deep postholes.  The pattern of these postholes is unlike any previously recorded. 

 

Students Claire Woerner and Shaun Lynch excavating deep postholes

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students also excavated the southeastern edge of the mound, trying to determine its original placement. The faculty plans to continue excavations this year to better define the exact edges of the mound. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edge of the mound fill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last year, students discovered two unique carved steatite (soapstone) artifacts. One was the head of a mammal figurine, and the other was the headless body of what might be a deer. Unfortunately, the head and body don’t match, but both are highly unusual artifacts. The style and manner of carving on the deer suggest that it might have been carved by one of Pardo’s Spanish soldiers rather than a native Joaran.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More research may help archaeologists determine if this is the case. If so, this would be a rare find. Exploring Joara hopes you can visit or volunteer at the Berry site in 2013 and see what we uncover this year. Please contact us for additional information.

Joara Pottery Festival

The 4th annual Joara Pottery Festival is quickly approaching. This year builds off the momentum that has been on-going with this exceptional event. The festival will be at the Old Armory building near downtown Morganton. The festival is on May 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $4 per person, children under 12 are free.

 

This year the festival will be kicked off with a Preview Party on May 17 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. which includes advance purchasing opportunities, live music, dinner, and spirits. Tickets are $40 per person, and must be purchased by May 10.  This lively event will be a great way to meet and spend more time with the potters and their works. 

 

Please visit the Joara Pottery Festival website at http://www.JoaraPotteryFestival.org

 

 

You can also see some of the pottery  created by this year's artists on our Facebook page (even if you don't have an account):

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151396566356185.1073741825.353824271184&type=1&l=175e293b28

 

 

Table Rock Middle School field trip

Sixty 8th graders from Table Rock Middle School visited the Catawba Meadows Living History Exhibit to participate in hands-on learning activities. The students participated in atlatl throwing, testing the difference in throwing a spear by hand or with an atlatl. The students also learned about the geology behind understanding stone tools and learned about flint knapping. They also helped continue construction on the palisade and played a game of Chunkey. A special "thank you" to Heather Buchanan at Table Rock for her help in organizing this field trip. These field trips are directly supported by the Community Foundation of Burke County, which also deserves a special "thank you."

 

Camp Lake James

Members of Camp Lake James visited Catawba Meadows on Saturday, February 16 for a workshop to learn about 16th century and earlier Native American life. Photos of the event can be seen by clicking the following link:

 http://goo.gl/pZzbh 

 

The group was able to learn about artifacts and how archaeologists study them, as well as try flint knapping before snow started falling. They braved the cold to also try throwing Atlatls. Thankfully we were able to move the event to the Wall Center for Archaeological Reseach and continue our activities indoors.

 

We look forward to visiting them on April 5th. 

Warren Wilson College

Warren Wilson College students recently were given a demonstration on flint knapping and learned the different ways stone tools have been made for thousands of years. Photos of the workshop can be seen by clicking the following link:

http://goo.gl/Khfok

 

The students worked hard to learn the geometry and physics involved in turning raw stone in to stone tools. 

The Exploring Joara Foundation • P.O. Box 296 • Morganton • NC • 28680

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