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Tuesday,
October 28th
 
 
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM 
 
 
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Gluten Free Recipe:

Pumpkin Quinoa Parfait

by Pop Sugar
 
Pumpkin Parfait — The Perfect Post-Workout Breakfast
Photo: Lizzie Fuhr 
 
When it comes to a fall breakfast that satisfies pumpkin cravings, I have yet to meet a recipe that compares to this pretty parfait. Packed with protein, complex carbohydrates, and plenty of warming fall spices, this is a healthy concoction that celebrates the season — but not at the expense of nutrition. Instead of a sugary pumpkin pastry full of refined carbs that make your blood sugar spike and leave you feeling hungry soon after you eat, this quick and easy 322-calorie hearty breakfast offers 25 percent of your daily fiber and nearly 15 grams of protein to keep you satisfied all morning long. It’s the perfect post-workout meal that still feels like a sweet indulgence.
 

INGREDIENTS

1 cup quinoa, cooked
3 tablespoons pumpkin puree
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1/2 cup plain greek yogurt or yogurt of your choice
1 tablespoon chopped apples, for garnish (optional)

DIRECTIONS

  • Mix cooked quinoa, pumpkin puree, cinnamon, and pumpkin pie spice in a medium bowl until well combined.
  • Layer your parfait in a small glass of your choice. Begin with the pumpkin-quinoa mixture, then add the yogurt of your choice, reserving about 2 tablespoons. Then, layer the rest of your quinoa mixture, and top off with the remaining yogurt.
  • Garnish with chopped apples or Fall fruit of your choice, and enjoy!
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Upcoming Session Dates
for the
Sensory Learning Program:
  
Monday, November 3

through
Friday, November 14

 
Monday, December 1

through
Friday, December 12

 
Monday, December 19

through
Friday, December 31

 
 
 
Did You Know?
 
 
SIRRI offers these services
for both children & adults:
  • Neurofeedback & Biofeedback
  • QEEG / Brain Mapping
  • Cognitive Retraining: memory, processing & problem solving skills
  • Attention, Concentration & Focus Training
  • Auditory & Visual Processing
  • Reading Development: fluency & comprehension
  • Balance, Coordination & Motor Planning Development
  • Stress & Anxiety Management
  • Peak Performance
 

Exercise Before School May Reduce ADHD Symptoms in Kids

Michigan State University

September 9, 2014

Paying attention all day in school as a kid isn't easy, especially for those who are at a higher risk of ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
 
A new study from Michigan State University and University of Vermont researchers shows that offering daily before-school, aerobic activities to younger at-risk children could help in reducing the symptoms of ADHD in the classroom and at home. Signs can include inattentiveness, moodiness and difficulty getting along with others.
 
The study can be found in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.
 
"Early studies suggest that physical activity can have a positive effect on children who suffer from ADHD," said Alan Smith, chairperson of MSU's Department of Kinesiology, who conducted the research along with lead author Betsy Hoza, a psychologist from the University of Vermont.
 
Previous MSU research has shown improved brain function and better math and reading skills in elementary students who were exposed to a bout of physical activity. Yet, it's not as widely known how consistent exercise might improve the broad range of symptoms and impairments associated with the disorder.
 
Over a 12-week period, Smith and Hoza studied about 200 early elementary school students ranging from kindergarten to second grade that either exhibited signs of ADHD or didn't. During the trial, students were randomly selected to participate in a group that completed moderate to vigorous physical activity each day before school, or a group that completed more sedentary classroom-type activities.
 
"Although our findings indicated that all participants showed improvements, children with ADHD risk receiving exercise benefited across a broader range of outcomes than those receiving the sedentary activities," Smith said.
 
Smith indicated that further studies are needed to better understand the frequency and amount of physical activity that can provide benefits to children and added that the effects of exercise may be different based on a child's age.
 
"Despite the number of remaining questions, physical activity appears to be a promising intervention method for ADHD with well-known benefits to health overall," he said. "This gives schools one more good reason to incorporate physical activity into the school day."
 
 
Michigan State University. "Exercise before school may reduce ADHD symptoms in kids." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 September 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140909093701.htm>.
 

 

Omega 3 can help children with ADD, experts say

University of Gothenburg

October 23, 2014

Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a certain kind of ADHD. These are the findings of a dissertation at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, which also indicates that a special cognitive training program can improve problem behavior in children with ADHD.
 
Between three to six percent of all school age children are estimated to have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). ADHD is a disorder that entails a difficulty controlling impulses and temper, sitting still, waiting, or being attentive for more than short periods at a time. There are various kinds of ADHD where disturbances in attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity have varying degrees of prominence.
 
ADHD is often treated with stimulant medications, which are effective for most, but do not work for everyone.
 
Relevant improvement
 
In this study, 75 children and adolescents with ADHD were given either the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 or a placebo over three months, and then they were all given omega 3/6 over three months. The study was conducted double-blind, which means that neither the researchers nor the participants were allowed to know whether they received the active capsules until afterwards.
 
"For the group as a whole, we did not see any major improvement, but in 35 percent of the children and adolescents who have the inattentive subtype of ADHD called ADD, the symptoms improved so much that we can talk about a clinically relevant improvement," says Mats Johnson, doctoral student at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.
 
Cognitive training
 
The levels of omega 3 and omega 6 were also measured in blood samples, where those who had a clear improvement of their symptoms also showed a better balance between the blood levels of these two fatty acids.
 
The dissertation also indicates that a cognitive training method called Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) can be a good alternative or complement in the treatment of ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD).
 
Solving problematic situations
 
With this method the children and the family receives help in training cognitive ability and solving problematic situations. The study included 17 children, whose families received up to ten weeks of CPS sessions. The families were then asked how much the behavioral problems improved directly after the treatment as well as six months afterwards.
 
"Our study of CPS as a treatment for ADHD and ODD is the first in Sweden. All families in our study completed the treatment, and half of them experienced a large or very large improvement of the behavioral problems," says Mats Johnson.
 
Combination treatment
 
The patient group that still had severe ADHD symptoms when the CPS treatment was complete were given the opportunity to supplement treatment with stimulants medication. In the follow-up six months later, 81 percent of all of the participating families experienced a large or very large improvement.
 
According to Mats Johnson, this indicates that CPS can improve problem-creating behavior in children ADHD and ODD, and that children with severe ADHD symptoms can be improved with a combination of CPS and ADHD medication.
 
 
University of Gothenburg. "Omega 3 can help children with ADD, experts say." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141023091815.htm>.
 
 
 
 
SIRRI Arizona • 4515 S. McClintock Drive, Suite 208 • Tempe, AZ 85282
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