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SIRRI Arizona
 
FREE INFORMATION SESSIONS
 
 
 
Monday, August 29
 
&
 
Monday, October 3, 2016
 
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM 
 
 
Please contact SIRRI
at (480) 777-7075 or e-mail
to reserve your seat(s).
 
If you are unable to attend,
please call for a free
one-on-one Consultation.
 
 
Empowerment Scholarship Accounts (ESA)
 
 
We are a Pre-Approved Facility
 
What can ESA funds be spent on?
 
According to the Arizona Department of Education, "Additional eligible expenses for children with special needs include:
 
Educational therapies or services from a licensed or accredited practitioner or provider"
 
 
Please contact us or azed.gov 
for details on using your ESA.
 
 
 
Recharge with sleep: Pediatric sleep recommendations promoting optimal health
 
June 13, 2016
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
ScienceDaily.com
 
 
For the first time, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has released official consensus recommendations for the amount of sleep needed to promote optimal health in children and teenagers to avoid the health risks of insufficient sleep.
 
The recommendations in the consensus statement are as follows:
  • Infants four to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Children one to two years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Children three to five years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Children six to 12 years of age should sleep nine to 12 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
  • Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep eight to 10 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.
The AASM consensus statement is published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine and will be discussed this week during SLEEP 2016, the 30th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS) in Denver.
 
"Sleep is essential for a healthy life, and it is important to promote healthy sleep habits in early childhood," said Dr. Shalini Paruthi, Pediatric Consensus Panel moderator and fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "It is especially important as children reach adolescence to continue to ensure that teens are able to get sufficient sleep."
 
The recommendations follow a 10-month project conducted by a Pediatric Consensus Panel of 13 of the nation's foremost sleep experts, and are endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Sleep Research Society and the American Association of Sleep Technologists. The expert panel reviewed 864 published scientific articles addressing the relationship between sleep duration and health in children, evaluated the evidence using a formal grading system, and arrived at the final recommendations after multiple rounds of voting.
 
The Pediatric Consensus Panel found that sleeping the number of recommended hours on a regular basis is associated with overall better health outcomes including: improved attention, behavior, learning, memory, emotional regulation, quality of life, and mental and physical health.
 
The panel found that sleeping fewer than the recommended hours is associated with attention, behavior and learning problems. Insufficient sleep also increases the risk of accidents, injuries, hypertension, obesity, diabetes and depression. The panel also found that insufficient sleep in teenagers is associated with increased risk of self-harm, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts.
 
"More than a third of the U.S. population is not getting enough sleep, and for children who are in the critical years of early development, sleep is even more crucial," said Dr. Nathaniel Watson, 2015 -- 2016 president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Making sure there is ample time for sleep is one of the best ways to promote a healthy lifestyle for a child."
 
Additionally, the panel found that regularly sleeping more than the recommended hours may be associated with adverse health outcomes such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and mental health problems.
 
 
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Recharge with sleep: Pediatric sleep recommendations promoting optimal health." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 June 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160613122419.htm>.

 
 
Gluten-Free Recipe:
 
Banana Nut
Overnight Oats
 
 
 

Ingredients:
  • ½ cup gluten free steel cut oats or gluten free rolled oats
  • ½ banana sliced
  • 1 tsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp flax meal
  • ½ tsp ground vanilla bean or extract
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • 2 T chopped pecans or walnuts
  • 1 chopped medjool date
  • ½ cup almond milk
Directions:
  • Throw all the ingredients except for the banana in a jar and mix well. 
  • Store overnight in the fridge. 
  • When you are ready to eat, slice the banana and mix it in.

Source: http://mywholefoodlife.com
 
 
AVAILABLE NOW!
 
SIRRI is Celebrating
13 Years!!
 
 
Physical activity boosts kids' brain power, academic prowess
 
 June 29, 2016
University of Exeter
ScienceDaily.com
 
A consensus statement which includes a University of Exeter researcher says exercise boosts kids' and young people's brain power and academic prowess.
 
Time taken away from lessons for physical activity is time well spent and does not come at the cost of getting good grades, say the 24 signatories to the statement on physical activity in schools and during leisure time, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
 
The Statement, which distils the best available evidence on the impact of physical activity on children and young people, was drawn up by a panel of international experts with a wide range of specialisms, from the UK, Scandinavia, and North America, in Copenhagen, Denmark, in April of this year.
 
It includes 21 separate statements on the four themes of fitness and health; intellectual performance; engagement, motivation and wellbeing; and social inclusion, and spans structured and unstructured forms of physical activity for 6 to 18 year olds in school and during leisure time.
 
It says that:
  • Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are good for children's and young people's brain development and function as well as their intellect
  • A session of physical activity before, during, and after school boosts academic prowess
  • A single session of moderately energetic physical activity has immediate positive effects on brain function, intellect, and academic performance
  • Mastery of basic movement boosts brain power and academic performance
  • Time taken away from lessons in favour of physical activity does not come at the cost of getting good grades
In terms of the physiological benefits of exercise, the Statement says that cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness "are strong predictors" of the risk of developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes in later life, and that vigorous exercise in childhood helps to keep these risk factors in check.
 
But frequent moderate intensity and, to a lesser extent, low intensity exercise will still help improve kids' heart health and their metabolism, while physical activity is a key component of the treatment of many long term conditions in 6-18 year olds. But the positive effects of exercise are not restricted to physical health, says the Statement.
 
Regular physical activity can help develop important life skills, and boost self-esteem, motivation, confidence and wellbeing. And it can strengthen/foster relationships with peers, parents, and coaches. And just as importantly, activities that take account of culture and context can promote social inclusion for those from different backgrounds, ethnicities, sexual orientation, skill levels and physical capacity.
 
Incorporating physical activity into every aspect of school life and providing protected public spaces, such as bike lanes, parks and playgrounds "are both effective strategies for providing equitable access to, and enhancing physical activity for, children and youth," says the Statement.
 
Professor Craig Williams, Director of the Children's Health and Exercise Research Centre, Sport and Health Sciences at Exeter was one of eight international speakers invited to provide expert statements to aid Danish colleagues revise their national consensus guidelines. Professor Williams said: "Over the 30 years we have been researching the health and well-being of young people, we have seen the accumulation of paediatric data across physiological, psychological, environmental and social issues. This 21 point consensus statement reflects the importance of enhanced physical activity, not just in schools but sports and recreational clubs, with the family, and even for those children with long term illness. At all levels of society we must ensure that enhanced physical activity is put into practice."
 
 
University of Exeter. "Physical activity boosts kids' brain power, academic prowess." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 June 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160629105758.htm>.
 
Can ADHD appear for the first time in adulthood?
 
May 23, 2016
By Lisa Rapaport
Reuters Health
 
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), usually diagnosed in children, may show up for the first time in adulthood, two recent studies suggest.
 
And not only can ADHD appear for the first time after childhood, but the symptoms for adult-onset ADHD may be different from symptoms experienced by kids, the researchers found.
 
“Although the nature of symptoms differs somewhat between children and adults, all age groups show impairments in multiple domains – school, family and friendships for kids and school, occupation, marriage and driving for adults,” said Stephen Faraone, a psychiatry researcher at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York and author of an editorial accompanying the two studies in JAMA Psychiatry.
 
Faraone cautions, however, that some newly diagnosed adults might have had undetected ADHD as children. Support from parents and teachers or high intelligence, for example, might prevent ADHD symptoms from emerging earlier in life.
 
It’s not clear whether study participants “were completely free of psychopathology prior to adulthood,” Faraone said in an email.
 
One of the studies, from Brazil, tracked more than 5,200 people born in 1993 until they were 18 or 19 years old.
 
At age 11, 393 kids, or 8.9 percent, had childhood ADHD. By the end of the study, 492 participants, or 12.2 percent, met all the criteria for young adult ADHD except the age of diagnosis.
 
Childhood ADHD was more prevalent among males, while adult ADHD was more prevalent among females, the study also found.
 
Just 60 of the nearly 400 kids with ADHD still had symptoms at the end of the study, and only 60 of the nearly 500 adults with ADHD had been diagnosed as children.
 
“The main take-home message is that adult patients experiencing significant and lasting symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity or impulsivity that cause impairment should seek evaluation, even if they began recently by their perception or if family members deny their existence in childhood,” senior study author Dr. Luis Augusto Rohde, a psychiatry researcher at Federal University of Rio Grande Do Sul in Brazil said by email.
The second study focused on 2,040 twins born in England and Wales in 1994 and 1995. During childhood, 247 of them met the diagnosis criteria for ADHD. Of those, 54 still met the diagnosis criteria for the disease at age 18.
 
Among 166 individuals with adult ADHD, roughly one third didn’t meet the criteria for ADHD at any of four evaluations during childhood, the study also found.
 
It’s possible some of these adults had undiagnosed ADHD as kids, but symptoms may also look different in older people than they do in children, said senior study author Louise Arseneault of King’s College in London.
 
People with adult ADHD may have more inattentive symptoms like being forgetful or having difficulty concentrating, whereas children with ADHD may have more hyperactive symptoms, Arseneault said by email. “And if adults do experience hyperactive symptoms, these symptoms may manifest more as feelings of internal restlessness rather than obvious hyperactive behavior like running or climbing around in inappropriate situations,” she said.
 

Referrals

The highest compliment
we can receive
is the referral
of your friends, family,
and co-workers.
 
Thank you!
 
Upcoming Session Dates for
The Sensory Learning Program:
 
 
Monday, August 22
through
Friday, September 2
 
Tuesday, September 6
through
Saturday, September 17
 
Monday, October 3
through
Friday, October 14
 
 
 
Did You Know?
 
 
SIRRI offers these services
for both children & adults:
  • Neurofeedback & Biofeedback
  • QEEG / Brain Mapping
  • Cognitive Retraining: memory, processing & problem solving skills
  • Attention, Concentration & Focus Training
  • Auditory & Visual Processing
  • Reading Development: fluency & comprehension
  • Balance, Coordination & Motor Planning Development
  • Stress & Anxiety Management
  • Peak Performance
 
SIRRI Arizona • 4515 S. McClintock Drive, Suite 208 • Tempe, AZ 85282
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