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SIRRI Arizona
 
Empowerment Scholarship Accounts (ESA)
 
 
We are a Pre-Approved Facility
 
What can ESA funds be spent on?
 
According to the Arizona Department of Education, "Additional eligible expenses for children with special needs include:
 
Educational therapies or services from a licensed or accredited practitioner or provider"
 
 
Please contact us or azed.gov 
for details on using your ESA.
 
 
 
Are you seeking more energy, better sleep and overall improved health?
 
SIRRI is Currently Offering
 
 
FREE
HEALTH ASSESSMENTS
 
(by Appointment Only)
 
 
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Call (480) 777-7075
 
 

Many parents in the dark about concussions, research shows

Concussion affects children in numerous sports

July 13, 2017
Source: University of Texas at Arlington
ScienceDaily.com
 
In the study, which was published in May in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Research, Cynthia Trowbridge, an associate professor of kinesiology and athletic trainer, and co-author Sheetal J. Patel of Stanford University, found that a significant number of caregivers have a limited understanding of concussions and their impact on a child's future.
 
"They did understand that it's a severe injury but they didn't understand how susceptible patients are," said Trowbridge, a noted expert on concussions in middle and high school athletes. "We found out that despite the fact that all parents had read some brochure or seen some TV show about concussions they had a low self efficacy about awareness. They tended not to know that concussions are associated with all sports, including track and field, volleyball and swimming."
 
Sports related concussions account for 53 percent of all head injuries in young people under the age of 19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. The CDC estimates that there are between 1.6 and 3.8 million sports related injuries among young people each year.
 
Concussions have received heightened attention in recent years because of the large number of retired professional football players who have sued the National Football League. These retired players claim that in some instances they were sent back into games despite the fact that their coaches knew there was a reasonable chance they may have suffered concussions on the gridiron.
 
In each of the 50 states there are laws requiring teams to take out athletes who may have suffered concussions. The decision is often made by members of the concussion care team, a group of objective health care professionals that includes a physician, an advanced practice nurse and an athletic trainer.
 
"We live in an age in which parents recognize more than ever the importance of athletics in instilling skills like discipline, concentration, team work and leadership in young people," said Anne Bavier, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Innovation. "But we need to be just as mindful about the kinds of dangerous, unseen injuries that come from playing sports. This study is a useful tool for building awareness and arming parents with some really good information."
 
Trowbridge said they were motivated to do the study to find out what caregivers understand about concussions and how to better educate them so they can be more effective in looking for symptoms or other possible signs of trouble.
 
"It's important to involve not only the athletes but the caregivers," said Trowbridge. "It is the caregiver that knows the child the best and can often recognize the signs and symptoms."
 
She added that studies show many young athletes do not always tell the truth about their symptoms because they want to continue playing.
 
"We are still learning how concussion symptoms resolve but we know that they don't get better by sending someone right back in with symptoms," Trowbridge said. "Sports is so magical and so many things can be learned from sports, but we have to give the caregivers the tools to be able to protect the youth athlete when they can't protect themselves."
 
Trowbridge said caregivers should be discriminating when picking physicians to examine their children for possible concussions, adding that not all physicians understand concussions. She encourages them to consult with neurologists, primary care physicians who specialize in sports medicine and concussion specialists when seeking medical advice.
 
 
University of Texas at Arlington. "Many parents in the dark about concussions, research shows: Concussion affects children in numerous sports." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 July 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170713154828.htm>.
 
 
 
Did You Know?
 
 
SIRRI offers these services
for both children & adults:
  • Neurofeedback & Biofeedback
  • QEEG / Brain Mapping
  • Cognitive Retraining: memory, processing & problem solving skills
  • Attention, Concentration & Focus Training
  • Auditory & Visual Processing
  • Reading Development: fluency & comprehension
  • Balance, Coordination & Motor Planning Development
  • Stress & Anxiety Management
  • Peak/Optimal Performance
  • FREE Health Assessments - NEW!
 
Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issues
 
July 17, 2017
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal
ScienceDaily.com
 
Consumption of artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame and sucralose, is widespread and increasing. Emerging data indicate that artificial, or nonnutritive, sweeteners may have negative effects on metabolism, gut bacteria and appetite, although the evidence is conflicting.
 
To better understand whether consuming artificial sweeteners is associated with negative long-term effects on weight and heart disease, researchers from the University of Manitoba's George & Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation conducted a systematic review of 37 studies that followed over 400,000 people for an average of 10 years. Only 7 of these studies were randomized controlled trials (the gold standard in clinical research), involving 1003 people followed for 6 months on average.
 
The trials did not show a consistent effect of artificial sweeteners on weight loss, and the longer observational studies showed a link between consumption of artificial sweeteners and relatively higher risks of weight gain and obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and other health issues.
 
"Despite the fact that millions of individuals routinely consume artificial sweeteners, relatively few patients have been included in clinical trials of these products," said author Dr. Ryan Zarychanski, Assistant Professor, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba. "We found that data from clinical trials do not clearly support the intended benefits of artificial sweeteners for weight management."
 
"Caution is warranted until the long-term health effects of artificial sweeteners are fully characterized," said lead author Dr. Meghan Azad, Assistant Professor, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba. Her team at the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba is undertaking a new study to understand how artificial sweetener consumption by pregnant women may influence weight gain, metabolism and gut bacteria in their infants.
 
"Given the widespread and increasing use of artificial sweeteners, and the current epidemic of obesity and related diseases, more research is needed to determine the long-term risks and benefits of these products," said Azad.
 
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issues." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 July 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170717091043.htm>.
 

Your Referrals Are Appreciated!

 
The highest compliment
we can receive
is the referral
of your friends, family,
and co-workers.
 
Thank you!
 
 
 
FREE
INFORMATION SESSION
 
  
 
Thursday, August 17, 2017
 
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM 
 
 
Please contact SIRRI
at (480) 777-7075 or e-mail
to reserve your seat(s).
 
If you are unable to attend,
please call for a free
one-on-one Consultation.
 
 

Gluten Free Recipe:

 

Ingredients
  • 3 large zucchini
  • 4 cups baby spinach
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 container light ricotta (475 grams)
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce of choice*
  • salt and pepper, to taste
 
Instructions
 
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Using a peeler, peel zucchini into strips. Discard ones that are too thin.
  3. In a large pan, add spinach and top with olive oil. Cook on medium-high heat until wilted.
  4. Add in garlic and saute for one more minute.
  5. Stir in dried basil.
  6. Take two piece of zucchini and place one on top of the other to create a "T".
  7. Add 1 tablespoon of ricotta to the center of the "T" and top with 1 teaspoon of spinach.
  8. Take one side of the bottom strip and fold over center. Take the other side of the bottom strip and fold over the other piece covering the center.
  9. Take one side of the top piece and fold over the center (tucking in if possible) and then fold the other side of the top piece and fold it over the other side covering the center (tucking in if possible).
  10. Repeat until all zucchini, ricotta and spinach has been used (mine made 20 ravioli).
  11. Place zucchini in a large oven-proof pan and top with salt and pepper.
  12. Bake for 20 minutes.
  13. Remove from oven and top with tomato sauce or sauce of choice.

 

 
Upcoming Session Dates for
The Sensory Learning Program:
 
 
Monday, August 14
through
Friday, August 25
 
 
Tuesday, September 5
through
Saturday, September 16 
 
 
Monday, October 2
through
Friday, October 13
 
SIRRI Arizona • 4515 S. McClintock Drive, Suite 208 • Tempe, AZ 85282
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