Subscribe
SIRRI Arizona
 
 
SIRRI is Currently Offering
Health Coaching!!
 
FREE HEALTH ASSESSMENTS
 
(by Appointment Only)
 
 Schedule Yours Today!
 Call (480) 777-7075
 
Who wouldn't love to have
MORE ENERGY
for their
KIDS & FAMILY?!?
 
Would you like:
  • More energy?
  • Better sleep?
  • Less stress?
  • Weight loss?
  • Overall improved health?
Gluten Free Recipe:
 
Cheese, Mushroom and Spinach Cauliflower Crust Calzone
  
 Makes 4 servings 
 
 
 
Ingredients
Cauliflower Crust:
1 small head cauliflower, cut into small florets (should yield 3 cups of cauliflower rice)
1 egg, lightly beaten
½ cup / 1.7 oz / 50 gr shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese ½ teaspoon fine grain sea salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
Filling:
4 teaspoons olive oil
1 8 oz package sliced crimini (baby bella) mushrooms
1 garlic clove, minced
½ teaspoon dried oregano
3 cups baby spinach
¾ cup shredded mozzarella cheese
 
Directions:
Preheat oven to 450°F (220°C) and place a rack in the middle. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and grease it with olive oil. Set aside.
Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and sauté until mushrooms are brown, stirring every so often, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and oregano and cook for 1 further minute. Add spinach stirring just until wilted, about 1 minute. Transfer to medium bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
Transfer the cauliflower rice to a mixing bowl and add egg, mozzarella, oregano, sea salt and pepper. Mix well.
Using your hands, press the mixture onto the baking sheet and shape into four discs (diameter should be about 4 inches).
Place in the oven and bake for 10 (no more no less, 10 minutes).
Remove from the oven and, working quickly, top with a bit of mozzarella cheese, then mushroom mixture, distributing evenly. Sprinkle some more mozzarella over mushrooms. Using a large spatula carefully lift the half of the disc without filling and fold it over the other part (that’s ok if the disc brakes a bit).
Use your fingers to push the edges of each calzone together and seal in the filling.
Bake in the oven for an additional 12 minutes.
Serve hot!
 
Empowerment Scholarship Accounts (ESA)
 
We are a Pre-Approved Facility
 
What can ESA funds be spent on?
 
According to the Arizona Department of Education, "Additional eligible expenses for children with special needs include:
 
Educational therapies or services from a licensed or accredited practitioner or provider"
  
 
Please contact us or azed.gov 
for details on using your ESA.
 
 
 Did You Know?
 
SIRRI offers these services
for both children & adults:
  • Neurofeedback & Biofeedback
  • QEEG / Brain Mapping
  • Cognitive Retraining: memory, processing & problem solving skills
  • Attention, Concentration & Focus Training
  • Auditory & Visual Processing
  • Reading Development: fluency & comprehension
  • Balance, Coordination & Motor Planning Development
  • Stress & Anxiety Management
  • Peak/Optimal Performance
  • FREE Health Assessments
  • Health Coaching 

Heavy screen time appears to impact childrens' brains: study

MedicalXpress.com
December 10, 2018
 
Researchers have found "different patterns" in brain scans among children who record heavy smart device and video game use, according to initial data from a major ongoing US study.
 
The first wave of information from the $300 million National Institute of Health (NIH) study is showing that those nine and 10-year-old kids spending more than seven hours a day using such devices show signs of premature thinning of the cortex, the brain's outermost layer that processes sensory information.
 
"We don't know if it's being caused by the screen time. We don't know yet if it's a bad thing," said Gaya Dowling, an NIH doctor working on the project, explaining the preliminary findings in an interview with the CBS news program 60 Minutes.
"What we can say is that this is what the brains look like of kids who spend a lot of time on screens. And it's not just one pattern," Dowling said.
 
The NIH data reported on CBS also showed that kids who spend more than two hours a day on screens score worse on language and reasoning tests.
 
The study—which involves scanning the brains of 4,500 children—eventually aims to show whether screen time is addictive, but researchers need several years to understand such long-term outcomes.
 
"In many ways, the concern that investigators like I have is, that we're sort of in the midst of a natural kind of uncontrolled experiment on the next generation of children," Dimitri Christakis, a lead author of the American Academy of Pediatrics' most recent guidelines on screen time, told 60 Minutes.
Initial data from the study will begin to be released in early 2019.
 
The academy now recommends parents "avoid digital media use—except video chatting—in children younger than 18 to 24 months."
 

Your Referrals Are Appreciated!

 
The highest compliment
we can receive
is the referral
of your friends, family,
and co-workers.
 
Thank you!
 
 
 

Autism, ADHD in One Child Tied to Raised Risk in Siblings

By Dennis Thompson
Dec. 10, 2018
HealthDay News
 
Autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are so closely linked that they not only run in families, but each increases the risk of the other in future siblings, a new study finds.
 
Younger siblings of children with autism have a 30-fold increased relative risk they'll be diagnosed with autism themselves. They're also nearly four times as likely to be diagnosed with ADHD, researchers reported.
The reverse also holds, if not as strongly. Later-born siblings of children with ADHD have 13 times increased odds of being diagnosed with ADHD and are more than four times as likely to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the findings showed.
 
"This really provides support for the idea that there are shared familial -- probably genetic -- mechanisms that underlie these two conditions and link them together," said lead researcher Meghan Miller.
 
However, the overall risk of a younger sibling being diagnosed with either condition remains low, added Miller. She is an assistant professor and licensed clinical psychologist with the University of California-Davis MIND Institute, in Sacramento.
 
"Most of these younger siblings did not develop either of these diagnoses," Miller said. "Although the odds are increased, most of the younger siblings do not end up with autism or ADHD."
 
Prior research has shown that both autism and ADHD run in families, and experts have suspected that either one might increase the risk of the other within a family, the study authors said.
 
To investigate this further, Miller and her colleagues classified almost 15,200 children based on whether an older sibling had been diagnosed with autism or ADHD. The pool included 730 kids who had an older sibling with ADHD, 158 who had an older sibling with autism, and almost 14,300 with no diagnoses in their immediate family.
 
The investigators then tracked the children to see whether they developed either neurodevelopmental disorder.
 
In younger siblings of children with autism, about 12 percent also developed autism and about 3.8 percent developed ADHD, Miller said.
 
For younger siblings of kids with ADHD, about 12 percent developed ADHD and 1.9 percent developed autism.
 
Dr. Andrew Adesman is chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics with Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. He said, "Simply put, these results suggest that families that have a child with either ADHD or ASD are at increased risk of having a child with one or the other condition."
 
Parents and pediatricians need to track a wider range of symptoms in the younger brothers and sisters of a child diagnosed with either ADHD and autism, Miller and Adesman said.
 
"We should broaden what we're monitoring for. Not only should we be monitoring for symptoms of autism in the younger siblings of children with autism, but we also should be monitoring for attention problems or self-regulation problems as well, and vice-versa," Miller said.
 
The findings were published online Dec. 10 in JAMA Pediatrics.
_____________________
Upcoming Session Dates for
The Sensory Learning Program:
   
 
Monday, January 21
through
Friday, February 1
 
Monday, February 4
through
Friday, February 15
SIRRI Arizona • 4515 S. McClintock Drive, Suite 208 • Tempe, AZ 85282
Subscribe | Unsubscribe | Send to a Friend | Preferences | Report Spam
Powered by MyNewsletterBuilder
Bookmark and Share