www.chickmoorman.com --- www.thomashaller.com March 1, 2006
The Response-Able Parent Newsletter #50

Welcome! This is a free newsletter on becoming a Response-Able parent raising Response-Able children.


Mission Statement

Our mission is to strengthen families and improve parent communication skills (including our own) by helping parents learn practical, usable verbal strategies for raising responsible, caring, confident children.


IN THIS ISSUE

1. Quote
2. Spirit Whisperer Contemplation
3. Bumper Sticker
4. Article: A Celebration of Family
5. Raising a Reader/Writer: A Child' View
6. New Product
7. We Get E-mail
8. Did You know?
9. Schedule of Events


1. Quote

"There is only one child in the world and the child's name is all children."

Carl Sandburg


2. Spirit Whisperer Contemplation

Silence can be powerful communication. Can you find a way to use it effectively in your parenting today? Will you add it to your day with intentionality?


3. Bumper Sticker

Seen on a Jeep Liberty in Alpena, MI:

My son skateboards better
than your honor student.


4. Article: A Celebration of Family

By Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller

International Parenting Commitment Day, March 20, is fast approaching. What do you have planned to celebrate this special day? Are you ready to commit or recommit to the sacred and important role of parenting so you can uplift, encourage, and inspire your children to become responsible, caring, confident people?

Please consider joining with millions of parents around the world who are making a commitment to parent with purpose. To celebrate International Parenting Commitment Day with your family consider implementing one of the following celebrations/rituals.

Commitment Celebrations/Rituals

Pledge Night

Convene a family meeting. Propose that the family design a pledge that reflects your belief that feelings of oneness and a sense of belonging are important in your family. Include the importance of placing family first, honoring each other's uniqueness, and the security of family structure somewhere in your pledge.

Allow all family members to have input by inviting suggestions and reaching a mutual consensus on the pledge. Display your pledge prominently in your home.

Principles of Work

Create a poster to display at your worksite. Include beliefs you have about how you want to "BE" during your work time. Include items such as: treat others with respect, listen to other's ideas, encourage others, and keep confidences private. Put at least 10 items on your Principles of Work. At the top, add, SUCCEED AT HOME FIRST. Share your work principles with your family.

Goal Setting Evening

After your children are in bed for the evening, set some family goals with your spouse. Read over the 10 Commitments or the resolutions listed on www.10commitments.net. Pick two or three to focus on for the upcoming year. With each commitment or resolution you choose, list activities you can do that will help you move in the direction of accomplishing your goal.

Example:

Goal: Use self-responsible language with our children.

Activities:

1.) Eliminate the words "makes me" from our language patterns. Change "You make me mad" to "I am feeling angry about this."
2.) Use the words "choose/decide/pick" over and over with our children. We will say, "I see you chose to help your brother," and "If you choose to throw the toy you will be choosing to give it a rest on the shelf for a while."
3.) We will stop "shoulding" on our children. We intend to replace our "shoulds" with "coulds."

Balloon Release

Buy two helium-filled balloons. Write on file cards several parenting concerns that have troubled you recently. Also fill file cards with parenting stressors: situations around which you create stress with your children (loud radios, poor table manners, etc.). Attach the cards to the balloon strings. Go outside, say a prayer asking God to take your stress and concerns and handle them in a way that achieves the greatest good for all concerned. Communicate your desire to be free of stress. Take a few deep breaths. Release the balloon, your concerns, and your stress into the air. Watch as the balloons carry your problems away. Feel lighter after having let go of all that stress.

Warm-Fuzzy Clothesline

A "warm-fuzzy" is a compliment (written or verbal) that is given to another person. Why not begin a warm-fuzzy clothesline in your home? Have each family member decorate clothespins in their own image and write their names on them. Hang them on a clothesline that you place in a prominent spot in your home (kitchen or den wall). Use the clothespins as mini-mailboxes to share notes of encouragement, affirmation, and praise with one another. Model this technique by sending at least one a day yourself.

Use this special day, March 20, to reconnect with your children by celebrating your mutual caring using one of the rituals above. When you do, you will be demonstrating the importance you place on the sacred role of parenting. Enjoy.

Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller are the authors of The 10 Commitments: Parenting with Purpose. They are two of the world's foremost authorities on raising responsible, caring, confident children. They publish a free monthly e-zine for parents. To sign up for it or obtain more information about how they can help you or your group meet your parenting needs, visit their websites today: www.chickmoorman.com or www.thomashaller.com.

CLICK HERE TO PREVIEW 10 COMMITMENTS BOOK.


5. Raising a Reader/Writer: A Child?s View

By Chick Moorman

Are you interested in developing a strong desire in your children to read so they can regularly add meaning and pleasure to their lives? Do you want them to be able to express their thoughts and ideas clearly on paper? Do you want to encourage your children from an early age to develop the two skills that are most strongly connected with school success: reading and writing?

Your answers to the questions above are most likely, "Yes." If so, there are a great number of books, educational experts, and educators who can offer a variety of suggestions on what you can do as a parent to instill a love for reading and a desire to write in your children. It is not the intent of this article to rehash what those books and experts have already explained. Instead, I will take a different tact. I will go directly to a child to see what valuable information can be gleaned on raising a reader/writer.

Reese Haller is the youngest published fiction author in the United States. As an eight-year-old he wrote Fred the Mouse: The Adventures Begin. Since its publication in 2005, Reese has been interviewed on many radio and TV shows, done book signings, and has lectured students and teachers all over the country on The Six Traits of Writing. His second book, Fred the Mouse: Making Friends, is currently at the printers and will be released soon.

So what does the youngest published fiction author in America think about reading and writing? What can parents learn for a nine-year-old boy about raising children? You might be surprised. I caught up with Reese at his home in Bay City, Michigan, recently and conducted the following interview.

Reese, you are the youngest published fiction author in America. Tell us what that feels like.

It feels very exciting. And it's fun. I like to get time off from school to travel to other schools to talk to kids and teachers about my love of reading and writing.

Did you always know you wanted to be an author? And if you did, what is your earliest recollection of that desire?

No, I didn't always know that I wanted to be an author. I do remember really liking to write and make books when I was still in preschool.

What things helped you the most to love writing?

My mom reading to me all the time. She still does it and I still like it when she reads to me. And our family is really into books. We have books in every room of our house.

What would be one thing you would tell parents to do to get their kids excited about reading and writing?

I would tell them to read to your kids a lot, and when you write things show them how you do it and how your words and their words look on paper.

What did your parents do that helped you the most to be a successful writer?

My parents made books about the everyday experiences that we had together as a family. We would go to the zoo and take pictures. Later, I would talk about the pictures and my parents would add my words under the pictures. Then we would make it into a book. We have picture books from when I was a baby, a trip to the park to feed ducks, and other things like that. We made books that tell about all kinds of experiences.

How did your mom make writing interesting for you?

My mom makes up songs about everything and puts things into a story in the song. So sometimes when I write I think about an experience and make it a song in writing, kind of like Mom.

What role did your dad play in helping you become a writer?

My dad is a storyteller. He makes up stories about different animals or people. Most of the time they are stories of stuff when he was a kid. He even makes up stories about me and my little brother. I love it when he tells us stories. He really makes the stories come alive by the way he tells them.

What are three things that you and your family do to make writing fun and interesting?

1. We write silly stories.
2. Writing is never a "have to." It is always something that we can choose to do or not.
3. We always help each other think up ideas and never make fun of someone's writing.

What do you like best about writing?

My favorite part of writing is the step that is called "word choice." I love to think about descriptive words and how I can paint a picture in the reader?s mind with my words.

Do you have a least favorite part of writing? If so, what is it and why?

My least favorite is the editing. It takes a lot of time to make sure everything is perfect. I still do it because I want my work to be the best, but the painting part is more fun.

What role did your teachers at school play in helping you become a writer?

My teachers were the ones who taught me the six traits of writing, and the six traits helped me understand the process of writing and how to make my writing more organized.

Do you have special skills and talents, or do you think other kids could do this, too?

I think that other kids can write books, too. They don't have to wait until they are an adult. They just have to do it in little parts and keep working towards their goal.

What do you want other kids to learn from your reading and writing?

That they don't have to wait to make a difference in the world. They can do it now.

CLICK HERE TO PREVIEW FRED THE MOUSE BOOK.


6. New Product: The Parent Advisor: 60 Articles to Ease Your Parenting Concerns

You asked for it! Now here it is! A CD collection, packed full of helpful parenting advice from Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller.

Many of you have e-mailed us sharing your appreciation of the Special Reports we offer on our websites and telling us how you have used them with your families. As you know, each report deals with a specific parenting concern such as ending morning madness, eliminating whining, getting your child to do homework, etc. Each report offers step-by-step advice to help you handle a typical parenting problem. We have been offering them to interested parents with a buy three and get a fourth one free? option. They are delivered electronically so they can be obtained instantly. A full list of titles is available at http://www.chickmoorman.com/books.html.

Several of you have written saying that you wanted to order more than 10 and wondered if there was a special price for the entire set. So here comes the good news. We have created a CD, The Parent Advisor: 60 Articles to Ease Your Parenting Concerns. It is jam-packed with 60 of the most popular articles written by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller. It contains "how-to" articles that give specific step-by-step suggestions for dealing with typical parenting concerns, and stories about real parents putting parenting skills into action in their families. These two- or three-page lessons list steps to take, pitfalls to watch out for, and important "do's" and "don'ts" to consider when addressing a parenting concern or preventing one from happening. Permission to reproduce these articles and share them with others comes with the package. To order this helpful and inspirational 167-page parenting resource go to http://www.chickmoorman.com/books.html.


7. We Get E-mails

Dear Chick,

I must thank you for the workshop you did for the Suzuki Teachers' Association here in Philadelphia. We continue to refer to your insights as we discuss working with our little ones and their parents. I wanted to take the time to share a recent situation that happened with my two-year-old.

She was watching a "Tubby the Tuba" video a few weeks ago and the scene involved Tubby standing in front of the music store window. In the window was Beethoven's bust and below him, the 5th Symphony score. Tubby began to play "Bum-bum-bum-BAAAAAH." Just then someone throws a shoe at him from above and yells, "Stop the noise!" So I said to my daughter, "Oh, who would do such a thing to poor Tubby when he's trying to play Beethoven?" My daughter turned to me and replied so earnestly, "Maybe Mozart."

I about fell over!

Best wishes from PA,

Kathy

Hello Kathy,

Thanks for the chuckle. I appreciate you taking the time to send it.

Warmly,

Chick

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Dear Chick and Thomas,

I love the stuff you guys did on praise. Thanks for taking the time to put that in a concise, user friendly order.

Here is something I noticed recently. Because we never say, "Good job," my two-year-old daughter does not expect that kind of response when she does something. Instead, she often joyfully says, "I did it!" when she accomplishes something, without requesting or requiring us to say anything. We often smile or add, "Yes you did!" I did not expect that whole "inner sense of accomplishment" experience to occur until she was much older. It feels so wonderful to see that she feels good about what she is doing and that she does not depend on us to provide an external evaluation for her. I didn't think that was something that could happen as early as two.

Thank you for your efforts.

Santa Barbara Momma


Dear Santa Barbara Momma,

Thank you for taking the time to share your observations. Yes, creating that internal standard through the use of descriptive and appreciative praise can be accomplished at an early age if you learn and consistently use the verbal skills we teach in the Parent Talk System and have available in our first-ever e-course, Good Praise/Bad Praise. We are hearing many positive reactions from subscribers who have purchased the e-course on praise and are encouraged to create another e-course in the near future.

Sincerely,

Chick and Thomas

Special Note: It is not too late to begin the three-session e-course on praise. For more information please CLICK HERE and then click on E-Courses or CLICK HERE TO REGISTER.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Thomas and Chick,

I am searching the internet for newsletters that are sent to parents of young children to make a suggestion. Since most people don't know how to react to someone who stutters and certainly don't know what to do if/when their own child starts stuttering, you can help some parents and their young children by giving them the information ahead of time so they are educated in how to react and what to do. It's sad that so many of us learn from our mistakes instead of being educated before we have situations with our children.

Please check out The Stuttering Foundation's website yourself and share it with your readers so they have the information they need. I wish I had known about them many years ago. The website is www.StutteringHelp.org. You will be helping all of your readers as well as all the people that stutter who come in contact with them. You may prevent one of their children from having to deal with a lifelong stutter.

Bless you! 

Bud


8. Did You Know?

A.) We strictly adhere to the United States federal laws of anti-spamming CAN-SPAM Act of 2003. If you received this e-mail newsletter from us it is because you signed up for it at one of our workshops or requested it on one of our websites.

B.) Parenting Awareness Michigan and the Michigan Coalition to Reduce Underage Drinking have partnered to develop a Michigan Parent-Teen Pledge. Parents and teens can review the pledge card together, discuss the important points listed, talk about Michigan laws related to underage drinking, and then each sign the pledge card. For free copies of the MI Parent-Teen Pledge card call 1-800-968-4968 or e-mail pnoffice@prevention.org. Download at www.preventionnetwork.org.

C.) Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in this country. Sixty-three percent of teens killed in motor vehicles were not wearing seat belts. While seat belt use is one of the most effective measures to decrease injuries and death in a crash, teens are less likely to wear a seat belt than other age groups.

D.) You can forward this newsletter to friends and relatives by scrolling to the bottom of this page and following the instructions.

E.) You can also be deleted from receiving this newsletter by following the instructions at the bottom of the page. We will get over it in a couple of weeks.

F.) One out of every six children in the United States has no health insurance.

G.) Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller do over 50 parenting programs a year. "The Five Voices of Effective Parenting" and "Parent Talk: Words that Empower, Words that Wound" are the two most popular. For more information on how to arrange one of these entertaining and skill-based presentations for your group, call Chick at 877-360-1477 or Thomas at 989-686-5356.


9. Schedule

March 6 - Bay City, MI
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm, Winning the Whining Wars presented by Thomas Haller. Offered through the Bay City Public Schools Parent Involvement and Education Grant. Location to be announced. To register please contact Sue Murphy at (989)671-8180 or murphys@bcschools.net

March 7 - Bay City, MI
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm, Week 3 of 10 Commitments 4 week study course presented by Thomas Haller. Offered through the Bay City Public Schools Parent Involvement and Education Grant. Location to be announced. To register please contact Sue Murphy at (989)671-8180 or murphys@bcschools.net

March 9 - Keene, NH
10:05 am - 11:00 am, Radio Interview with Chick Moorman, Family Focus International Parenting Commitment Day. WKBK AM - 1290, Keene, NH.

March 11 - Walled Lake, MI
11:25 am - 1:45 pm, Creating a Culture of Accountability in the Family presented by Thomas Haller, Walled Lake Schools Parent Education Fair, Walled Lake Central High School, Walled Lake MI. For more information contact Alec Bender (248) 956-4200.

March 11 - Walled Lake, MI
1:45 pm - 2:55 pm, The Five Voices of Effective Parenting presented by Thomas Haller, Walled Lake Schools Parent Education Fair, Walled Lake Central High School, Walled Lake MI. For more information contact Alec Bender (248) 956-4200.

March 13 - Bay City, MI
9:00 am - 3:00 pm, Literacy Day with Reese Haller for the students of Immanuel Lutheran School, Bay City, MI.

March 13 - Bay City
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm, How to Inspire Children to Write presented by Thomas Haller, MacGregor Elementary, Bay City MI. Free to the public to register contact the school at (989) 892-1558.

March 14 - Bay City, MI
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm, Week 4 of 10 Commitments 4 week study course presented by Thomas Haller. Offered through the Bay City Public Schools Parent Involvement and Education Grant. Location to be announced. To register please contact Sue Murphy at (989)671-8180 or murphys@bcschools.net

March 15 - Swartz Creek, MI
9:00 am - 3:00 pm, Literacy Day with Reese Haller for the students of Elms Road Elementary School, Swartz Creek, MI.

March 17 - Vancouver, WA
9:45 am - 2:15 pm, The Parent Talk System presented by Chick Moorman, Washington State University (Annual Conference), WSU, Vancouver, WA. For information contact Jane Lanigan at 360-546-9715 or email lanigan@vancouver.wsu.edu.

March 18 - Detroit, MI
12:00 pm - 1:50 pm, Becoming a Soul Model for Students presented by Chick Moorman, Michigan Reading Association Annual Conference, Cobo Center, Detroit, MI. Contact Jeffrey Beal, Conference Chair, at 800-672-7323.

March 18 - Detroit, MI
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm, The 10 Best/Worst Things You Can Say to Your Students presented by Chick Moorman, Michigan Reading Association Annual Conference, Cobo Center, Detroit, MI. Contact Jeffrey Beal, Conference Chair, at 800-672-7323.

March 18 - Detroit, MI
2:00pm - 3:50pm, How to Inspire Children to Write presented by Thomas Haller, Michigan Reading Association's 50th Annual convention in Detroit, MI.

March 19 - Detroit, MI
1:00pm - 2:50pm, The Power of Story Telling presented by Thomas Haller, Michigan Reading Association's 50th Annual convention in Detroit, MI

March 22 - Midland, MI
6:30pm - 8:30pm, How to Inspire Children to Write presented by Thomas Haller, parent evening presentation following Literacy Day with Reese Haller at Chippawassee Elementary School, Midland MI.

March 23 - Madison Heights, MI
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm, Building Responsibility in Children presented by Chick Moorman, Japhet School, Madison Heights, MI. For information contact Robin Pospisil at Japhet School 248-585-9150 or email robinpospisil@japhet.org.

March 27 - Jackson, MI
Literacy Day with Reese Haller for the students and teachers of Dibble Elementary, Jackson, MI.

March 27 - Dearborn, MI
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm, Parent Talk: Words That Empower, Words That Wound presented by Chick Moorman, Dearborn Public Schools, Geer Park School, Dearborn, MI. For information contact Amy Gwizdz at 313-827-2300 or email gwizdza@dearborn.k12.mi.us.

March 29 - Bloomfield Hills, MI
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm, Parent Talk: Words That Empower, Words That Wound presented by Chick Moorman, Bloomfield Hills, Doyle Center, Bloomfield Hills, MI. For information contact Renee Herbert at 248-341-6300 or email rherbert@bloomfield.org.

March 30 - Marlette, MI
6:30pm - 8:30pm, How to Inspire Children to Write presented by Thomas Haller, parent evening presentation following Literacy Day with Reese Haller at Marlette Middle School, Marlette MI.


Chick Moorman

Contact Chick at 1-877-360-1477 (toll free) or e-mail him at ipp57@aol.com.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT CHICK'S WEBSITE.


Thomas Haller

Contact Thomas at?989-667-5654 or e-mail him at thomas@thomashaller.com.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THOMAS' WEBSITE.


Copyright 2006 Chick Moorman Seminars and Thomas Haller Seminars, all rights reserved. Share this with your circle.


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