www.personalpowerpress.com October 25, 2006
The Response-Able Educator Newsletter #56

Welcome! This is a free newsletter about becoming a Response-Able educator who develops Response-Able students.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to inspire, encourage, and uplift the spirits of educators so they can in turn inspire, encourage, and uplift the spirits of their students.

__________________________________________________________________________________

If you are unable to receive HTML format emails, please copy and paste the link below to view this Newsletter.

http://www.mynewsletterbuilder.com/tools/view_newsletter.php?newsletter_id=1409580899


In This Issue

1. Quote
2. Sign of the Times
3. Bumper Sticker
4. Spirit Whisperer Contemplation
5. We Get E-mail
6. Did You Know?
7. Product of the Month
8. Schedule of Events


1. Quote

"Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass on a summer day listening to the murmur of water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is hardly a waste of time."

Sir J. Lubbock


2. Sign of the Times

Spotted on a wall in a middle-school classroom in an inner city school:

We read to be entertained,
educated or inspired,
or just to rejoice in the use of language.
We read to be touched
by other people's lives.
Perhaps most of all,
we read because it transports us
to worlds beyond the limits
of our imaginations.

Source unknown


3. Bumper Sticker

Seen on a white Mercury Villager in Traverse City, MI :

My Hockey Mom Can Beat Up

Your Soccer Mom.


4. Spirit Whisperer Contemplation

Maybe the student who acts out has forgotten who he really is. Maybe your job is to awaken him rather than punish him.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE SPIRIT WHISPERER CONTEMPLATIONS.


5. We Get E-mail

Dear Mr. Moorman and Mr. Haller,

I get both your educator newsletter and your parent newsletter. I usually like them both, but recently it appears that you are taking dead aim at teachers who assign homework. I would like to know why.

I am a veteran middle school teacher who assigns homework every week. So do many of my colleagues. We think it is beneficial for our students to do some homework. We don't think there is anything wrong with it. Obviously you do!

If you are going to attack those of us who assign homework I think you ought to prove that is it harmful. Where is your research? Where do you get your facts? You need to step up and show that homework is harmful before you make the suggestions you do in your newsletters. If you think homework is bad, prove it.

Concerned Educator

---------------------------------------------

Hello Concerned Educator,

First, we suggest you take a couple of deep breaths. This is not about you personally or your colleagues. It is about the concept of homework. Our goal is not to attack you. It is to help educators and parents take a serious look at this rarely questioned practice of assigning homework.

You say you want us to prove that homework is bad. It seems to us that's a backwards approach. Shouldn't those who assign homework be the ones asked to provide support for that choice? The burden of proof clearly falls on those instituting the strategy. Still, we suspect it might be enlightening and useful to you and other readers if we share some of the research findings that have led us to take the stand we have regarding homework. We invite you to compare them with the research you might be aware of that defends the use of homework as a learning strategy. 

1. From 1997 to 2002, the proportion of six-to-eight-year-old children being assigned homework on any given day went up from 34 percent to 64 percent. Children of that age more than doubled their weekly time studying during those same years. (Hofferth, Sandra L. and John F. Sandberg, "How American Children Spent Their Time," Journal of Marriage and Family, February 20, 2002.) These researchers confirmed that time spent doing homework was not associated with higher or lower scores on any achievement tests.

2. There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students. There is only a moderate correlation between homework and achievement in middle school. Even in high school too much homework may diminish its effectiveness and become counterproductive. (Cooper, Harris, Jorgianne Civey, and Erica A. Patall, "Does Homework Improve Academic Achievement? A Synthesis of Research, 1987-2003." Review of Educational Research, 76, 2006, 1-62.) Cooper's research review correlating time spent on homework with test scores and grades revealed "nearly nonexistent" effects for grades 3 through 5. The correlation was extremely low for grades 6 through 9.

3. If research tells us anything [about homework, it's that even when achievement gains have been found, they have been minimal, especially in comparison to the amount of work expended by teachers and students. (Barber, Bill, "Homework Does Not Belong on the Agenda for Educational Reform," Educational Leadership, May, 1986, 55-57.)

4. A Trends in International Mathematics and Science study looked at 27 states and 37 other countries. They found there was little relationship between the amount of homework assigned and the students performance. (Mullis Ina V. S. Michael O. Martin, Albert E. Beaton, Eugenio J. Gonzalez, Dana L. Kelly, and Theresa A. Smith. Mathematics and Science Achievement in the Final Years of Secondary School : IEA's Third International Mathematics and Science Report, Boston: International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, Lynch School of Education, Boston College, 1998.)

5. Many of the countries with the highest scoring students on achievement tests, such as Japan, Denmark, and the Czech Republic, have teachers who assign little homework. It seems that the more homework a nation's teachers assign, the worse that nation's students do on the achievement tests. (Baker, David P. and Gerald K. LeTendre, National Differences, Global Similarities: World Culture and the Future of Schooling. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2005.)

6. There is no research to support the belief that homework helps students to develop any of the characteristics that appear under the heading of work habits. (Kohn, Alfie, The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing, Da Capo Press, Cambridge, MA: 2006)

7. There has been no research done on whether homework teaches responsibility, self-discipline, or motivation. That's just a value judgment. The counter argument can just as easily be made that homework teaches kids to cheat, do the least amount of work, or to get by. (Kralovec, Etta and john Bruell. The End of Homework: Hoe Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning. Boston: Beacon 2000.)

8. American teachers lead the world in grading homework, with 82 percent giving it marks. Only 22 percent of teachers in Hong Kong, 14 percent in Japan, and 6 percent in Germany grade homework. (Baker, David P. and Gerald K. LeTendre, National Differences, Global Similarities: World Culture and the Future of Schooling. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2005.)

9. A national survey conducted by the University of Michigan found that family meals are the single strongest predictor of better achievement scores and fewer behavioral problems for children ages three to twelve. It was a better predictor than the amount of time spent studying. (Bennett Sara and Nancy Kalish. The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is Hurting Our Children and What We Can Do About It. Crown Publishers New York: 2006, 60.

10. Homework practices tend to be based on individual teachers beliefs rather than on consensually agreed upon research-based practices. (Byran, Tanis, and Karen Burstein. "Improving Homework Completion and Academic Performance: Lessons from Special Education," Theory into Practice, 43, 2004: 213-219.)

11. Harris Cooper states, "There is no homework system or explicit rules for homework. You won't find a system in schools of education and you won't find it in the schools where only one in three districts even has a homework policy. Most teachers are winging it." (Cooper, Harris, James L. Lindsay, Barbara Nye, and Scott Greathouse. "Relationships Among Attitudes About Homework, Amount of Homework Assigned and Completed, and Student Achievement." Journal of educational Psychology. 90, 1998: 70-83.

12. The University of Minnesota's Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement issued a report in 1994 that said, "It is surprising how little attention is paid the topic of homework in teacher education. Most teachers in the United States report . . . they received little training in how to devise good assignments, how to decide how much homework to give, and how to involve parents."

13. In a 2003 California State University at Fullerton study of teachers of all grade levels, every single one believed in giving homework--despite the fact that not one of their schools or school districts had ever studied whether their system was really working. According to Professor Stephen Aloia who conducted the survey, "These teachers have no data to support their assumptions that homework is beneficial, they simply think it is beneficial."

14. "Whenever homework crowds out social experience, outdoor recreation, and creative activities, and whenever it usurps time that should be devoted to sleep, it is not meeting the basic needs of children and adolescents." (American Educational Research Association)

15.  A survey done by Public Agenda, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research group, found that 50 percent of parents surveyed said they have had a serious argument with their children over homework. Thirty-four percent said it became a source of struggle and stress for them and their children. (Bennett Sara and Nancy Kalish. The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is Hurting Our Children and What We Can Do About It. Crown Publishers New York: 2006, 60.

These are only a few of the research findings on homework. If you want to explore the issue of homework in more depth, we suggest you read The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is Hurting Our Children and What We Can Do About It, by Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, and The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing, by Alfie Kohn. Both of these books are full of research about homework and detail how it is negatively affecting our children and their families

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller


6. Did You Know?

A.) Teachers in Columbia, Maryland, have secret pals. The project, which is an effort to increase faculty unity and warmth, works like this:

At the beginning of each year, faculty members draw names from a hat. If you get your own name, you put it back. Otherwise, the name you draw becomes your secret pal and you tell no one. For a period of time, one month or longer, each secret pal sends notes, cards, little gifts, thoughtful ideas, words of encouragement, etc., to his/her secret pal. At the end of the designated time period, the staff has a get-together. Small prizes are awarded to those who can guess their secret pal.

B.) Research shows that emotional intelligence may be more important than traditional intelligence in determining life success. (Goleman, Boyatzis, & McKee, 2002) Source: Performance Learning System

C.) Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano wants Arizona teenagers to stay in school until they are eighteen or until they graduate. She says this is part of a plan to modernize and revamp the state's educational system. It is an effort to meet the needs of a competitive workplace.

Arizona Chief State School Officer Tom Horne disagrees. He says, "If they don't want to be in school, they can be disruptive. Kids who are 17 or 18 and don't want to be in a certain place can create a lot of havoc. In some cases, it's better for kids to work and then realize they need to come back to school."

D.) Texas schools lose a student every four minutes. The first statewide study of high school dropouts showed a loss of over 2 million students.

Is it just us or does it seem to you, too, that some of those students are getting left behind.

E.) Thomas Haller and Chick Moorman have developed a comprehensive classroom discipline seminar called The 5 Voices of Classroom Discipline. The 5 voices are nurture, structure, teaching, accountability, and debriefing, and they can be used in any classroom discipline situation. In this seminar teachers learn which of the 5 voices is their predominant voice and how to use the other voices to strengthen their discipline system. Included are practical ideas you can put to use immediately to prevent discipline problems from occurring and handle effectively those that do. This one-day seminar helps teachers reduce power struggles, decrease resistance and resentment, and increase the array of discipline tools they have in their professional toolbox.


7. Product of the Month - Our Classroom: We Can Learn Together

by Chick Moorman and Dee Dishon

Hardcover book, 215 pages ($19.95)

This book will help K-6 teachers create a classroom environment where discipline problems are less likely to occur and where students are less likely to activate the new three R's -- Resistance, Reluctance, and Resentment. It will show you how to build an atmosphere of togetherness that focuses on strategies that foster cooperation, interdependence, and mutual respect.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER OUR CLASSROOM.


8. Schedule of Events

October 27 - Dearborn, MI
9:00 am - 12:00 pm, Strategies for Reaching "At Risk" Students (K-6) presented by Chick Moorman, Global Educational Excellence, Dearborn, MI. For information e-mail Carolyn Ayers at carolyn@issaproperties.com.

October 27 - Dearborn, MI
9:00 am - 12:00 pm, Strategies for Achievement Motivation and Behavior Management (9-12) presented by - Thomas Haller, Global Educational Excellence, Dearborn, MI. For information e-mail Carolyn Ayers at carolyn@issaproperties.com.


October 27 - Dearborn, MI
1:00 - 3:00 pm, Strategies for Reaching "At Risk" Students (7-12) presented by Chick Moorman, Global Educational Excellence, Dearborn, MI. For information e-mail Carolyn Ayers at carolyn@issaproperties.com.

October 27 - Dearborn, MI
1:00 - 3:00 pm, Strategies for Achievement Motivation and Behavior Management (1-3) presented by Thomas Haller, Global Educational Excellence, Dearborn, MI. For information e-mail Carolyn Ayers at carolyn@issaproperties.com.

October 31 - Flint, MI
11:30 am - 2:30 pm, Celebrate the Spirit Whisperers, Kearsley Public Schools, Armstrong Middle School, Flint, MI. For information contact Martha Davis at 810-591-7640 or e-mail mdavis@mail.kearsley.k12.mi.us.

November 3 - Jackson, MI
Advanced Training Associates presentation, Stress Management 501 presented by Thomas Haller, approved for 1 contact hour of CEU's for Social Workers, Jackson, MI. For more information contact Phyllis at prmyers@dmci.net.

November 3 - Jackson, MI
Advanced Training Associates presentation, Social Work Ethics presented by Thomas Haller, approved for 5 contact hours of CEU's for Social Workers, Jackson, MI. For more information contact Phyllis at prmyers@dmci.net.

November 4 - Midland, MI
8:40 - 9:45 am, Keynote Presentation by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller, Enlightened Parenting, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
10:00 - 11:00 am, Developing Your Child's Inner Authority presented by Chick Moorman, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
10:00 - 11:00 am, How to Get Your Kids to Do Homework presented by Thomas Haller, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
11:15 am - 12:15 pm, The 5 Voices of Effective Parenting presented by Chick Moorman, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
11:15 am - 12:15 pm, Creating a Culture of Accountability in your Home presented by Thomas Haller, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
12:30 - 1:30 pm, How to Inspire Children To Write presented by Reese Haller, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
1:45 - 2:45 pm, Eliminating Negative Behaviors presented by Chick Moorman, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

November 4 - Midland, MI
1:45 - 2:45 pm, Ending Morning Madness/Banishing Bedtime Blues presented by Thomas Haller, Together For Kids Conference, Dow Midland High School, Midland, MI. For information contact Tonya Coty at 989-631-5892 or e-mail tcoty@mcesa.k12.mi.us. Click on http://togetherforkids.homestead.com/TFK_Conf_Brochure.pdf for a full brochure.

Nov. 6 - Ann Arbor, MI
Classroom Management: The 5 Voices of Effective Discipline, Ann Arbor Public Schools, Ann Arbor, MI.  For information contact Joyce Hunter at 734-994-2315 or email hunterj@aaps.k12.mi.us.


November 9 - Clinton Township, MI
7:00 - 9:00 pm, Parent Talk: Words That Empower, Words That Wound presented by Chick Moorman, Montessori Children's Academy, Clinton Township, MI. For information contact Daniella DeMichele at daniella76@hotmail.com.

November 11 - Pontiac, MI
9:00 am - 3:00 pm, Classroom Management presented by Chick Moorman, Michigan Montessori Society, Oakland University, Pontiac, MI. For information contact Catharine Calder at ccalder@meadowmontessori.org.

November 11 - Saginaw, MI
10:00 am - 11:00 am, 10 Best Things to Say to Your Partner presented by Thomas Haller, About Women Expo, Ryder Center, SVSU. For information email tweighman@thesaginawnews.com.

November 11 - Saginaw, MI
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm, How to Inspire Children to Write presented by Reese Haller, About Women Expo, Ryder Center, SVSU. For information email tweighman@thesaginawnews.com.

November 17 - Lansing, MI
Advanced Training Associates presentation Social Work Ethics presented by Thomas Haller, approved for 5 contact hours of CEU's for Social Workers, Lansing, MI. For more information contact Phyllis at prmyers@dmci.net.

November 20 - Monroe, MI
Literacy Day Celebration, The 6 Traits of Writing, presented by Thomas Haller and Reese Haller, and evening parent presentation, How to Inspire Children to Write, presented by Thomas Haller, Waterloo Elementary School, Monroe, MI. For more information contact Lisa at mclauch2@monroe.k12.mi.us.

November 27 - Cancun, Mexico
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm, Couple Talk presented by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller, Cancun, Mexico. For more information contact Cristina Almeida at 998-110-0818 or email calmeida11@hotmail.com.

November 28 - Cancun, Mexico
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm, Teacher Talk presented by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller, Cancun, Mexico. For more information contact Cristina Almeida at 998-110-0818 or email calmeida11@hotmail.com.

November 29 - Cancun, Mexico
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm, Talk Sense to Yourself�presented by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller, Cancun, Mexico. For more information contact Cristina Almeida at 998-110-0818 or email calmeida11@hotmail.com.

November 30 - Cancun, Mexico
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm, Parent Talk for Adolescents�presented by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller, Cancun, Mexico. For more information contact Cristina Almeida at 998-110-0818 or email calmeida11@hotmail.com.


Thomas Haller

Contact Thomas at 989-686-5356 or e-mail him at thomas@thomashaller.com.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THOMAS' WEBSITE.


Chick Moorman

Contact Chick at 1-877-360-1477 (toll-free) or e-mail him at ipp57@aol.com.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT CHICK'S WEBSITE.

 


• • • •

Subscribe Unsubscribe Preferences Send To A Friend
Powered by Mynewsletter Builder  
A member of The ByRegion Network  

report spam