Response-Able Educator Newsletter #77

January 6, 2009

Welcome! This is a free newsletter about becoming a Response-Able educator who develops Response-Able students.


Mission Statement

Our mission is to inspire, encourage, and uplift the spirits of educators so they can in turn inspire, encourage, and uplift the spirits of their students.

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In This Issue

1. Quote
2. Spirit Whisperer Contemplation
3. Bumper Sticker
4. Sign of the Times
5. Article: This Sucks


1. Quote

"When we know that the cause of something is in ourselves, and that we (ourselves) are one of the few things in the universe that we have the right and the ability to change, we begin to get a sense of the choices we really do have, an inkling of the power we have, a feeling of being in charge…of our lives, of our future, of our dreams."

 

John-Roger and Peter McWilliams


2. Spirit Whisperer Contemplation

What facial expressions do you see today? Watch for them. Notice how you interpret them. What effect do the interpretations have on you? What degree of influence do you give them?

 

Get a full year of SW Contemplations free when you order the Spirit Whisperer book.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE SPIRIT WHISPERERS BOOK AND GET SPIRIT WHISPER CONTEMPLATIONS FREE.

3. Bumper Sticker

Spotted on a green Mazda MX in Calgary, Canada:

 

To learn anything

You must first admit

You don’t know everything.


4. Sign of the Times

A.)  Observed on a T-shirt worn by a workshop participant in Killfish, NY:

No earpiece.
No cell phone.
I really am
Talking to myself!


B.)  Seen on a wall in a junior high school administrator's office:

     It is not easy . . .

To Apologize,

To Begin Over,

To Be Unselfish,

To Admit an Error,

To Face a Sneer,

To Be Charitable,

To Be Considerate,

To Learn from Mistakes,

To Forgive and Forget,

To Think Before You Act,

To Control Your Temper,

To Take Responsibility,

To Share Your feelings,

To See The Silver Lining.

BUT IT USUALLY PAYS.


C.) Spotted in a high school math classroom:

     The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference. He acquired his size from too much __________.

Fill in the blank with the correct answer, turn it in to me on a file card, and you will earn two bonus points towards your semester grade.

Answer: He acquired his size from too much pi.


D.) Sign seen on the lawn of a drug rehab center:

Keep Off the Grass.


5. Article: "This sucks!"

By Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller


"I hate this. It sucks."
"Well, that sucks."
"This is boring. It sucks big-time." 

"This sucks" was a favorite phrase of Mary Traber's alternative high school students earlier this year. With emotionality and intensity they used the phrase to show their distain for assignments, classroom activities, or directions not to their liking.

While the students found "This sucks" to be a dramatic and articulate way to express their feelings, Mary Trabor did not. She found the wording distasteful, disrespectful, and inappropriate. So she set out to eliminate its use in her classroom.

As a veteran professional educator of over ten years, Mary knew that punishing those who used the phrase would not work. Writing students up, sending them to the office, or assigning them a detention would do little to alter their choice of language. Putting a student's name on the board, calling them out in front of the class, or bribing them with treats or bonus points were strategies she had previously found to be ineffective. Mary chose instead to take the teaching stance. She knew that if she wanted a behavior, she would have to teach a behavior. She set out to do just that.

Mary figured she could confront and stop the "This sucks" comment every time she heard it. And she also knew she would have to stop it endlessly unless she helped her high schoolers learn a replacement behavior—one that would satisfy their need to express distain for what was happening in their lives. Unless she gave her students something different to say, she realized they would return to the comfortable and habitual use of the phrase she strongly disliked.

"I know you like saying, 'This sucks,'" she informed them one morning. "It helps you express your frustration and opinion about what is currently happening. I, on the other hand, find it offensive and distasteful. It does not fit with my personal preference of showing disapproval. I want to honor your need to communicate to me what you think sucks. And I want you to honor my need to have that sentiment expressed in a way that is not offensive to me."

"From now on," she told her students, "when you think something sucks, tell me this way: 'This does not fit with my personal preference.'" She then wrote the new replacement phrase on the chalkboard. "When I hear, 'This does not fit with my personal preference,' I will know that you mean, 'This sucks.' You will be telling me what you think sucks in a new way, one that I can hear more easily and be in a better frame of mind to process."

"What do you think of this idea?" she asked.

"It doesn't fit with my personal preference," a student quipped. All the other students laughed. So did their teacher.

"Thank you, Ramone. I now know that you think the idea sucks and I was able to hear that with more receptive ears when you stated it in a way that fit with my personal preference."

"Let's practice," she suggested. "I'll make a statement, and if you think it sucks, say, 'This doesn't fit with my personal preference.'" She began with, "There will be an hour of homework tonight."

"This doesn't fit with my personal preference," most of her students responded in unison.

"Take out your math books. We're going to review yesterday's lesson."

"This doesn't fit with my personal preference."

"It's time for a quiz."

"This doesn't fit with my personal preference."

"No homework tonight."

Silence.

"We're going to take turns reading aloud."

"This doesn't fit with my personal preference."

Following the experience of chanting in unison, Mary told her students that she would appreciate their cooperation in the future by informing her of what they thought sucks using the new language. Not all of her students remembered every time. In the heat of the moment, a few "This sucks" were uttered. Some students caught themselves and immediately followed "This sucks" with, "I mean, this doesn't fit with my personal preference."

Over time, "This sucks" ended as the predominant phrase used in her classroom to voice disapproval. Because of Mary's efforts to teach an appropriate replacement behavior, it was slowly replaced with a phrase that more closely fit her personal preference.

Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller are the co-authors of Teaching the Attraction Principle to Children: Practical Strategies for Parents and Teachers to Help Children Manifest a Better World. They are two of the world's foremost authorities on raising responsible, caring, confident children. They publish a free monthly e-zine for educators and another for parents. To sign up for them or to learn more about the seminars they offer teachers and parents, visit their websites today: www.chickmoorman.com and www.thomashaller.com


Teaching the Attraction Principle to Children: Practical Strategies for Parents and Teachers to Help Children Manifest a Better World

CLICK HERE TO ORDER TEACHING THE ATTRACTION PRINCIPLE TO CHILDREN.

Copyright

Copyright 2008 Chick Moorman Seminars and Thomas Haller Seminars, all rights reserved. Share this with your circle.

You Asked for It

When are you going to do a blog?

We have heard that question often in the past two years. And we have never had a really good answer to deliver. All we could tell you is that we had been purposefully holding off on beginning a blog. The timing didn’t seem right. Our energies were going into other projects.

Now is the time. Beginning January 1, 2009, you can check out our new site at www.uncommon-parenting.com. It will feature a regular blog on uncommon parenting. At this site we intend to combine all our resources that help people move from the parenting world that is . . . to the parenting worlds that could be. If you desire to parent like no one else so your children can grow up to be like no one else, check us out at www.uncommon-parenting.com.



SPECIAL OFFER

Extended by Popular Demand

There has never been anything like this!

Now, for the first time ever . . .

a book by kids, for kids, on how to be successful.

Yes, it is here, and it is time for you to get one.

"Every teacher should have one."
"Every middle school student needs this book."

---Typical comments from educators who have seen this incredible book

Parents and educators want children to be successful. Coaches, school administrators, and counselors want children to be successful. Politicians, clergy, and grandparents want children to be successful. 101 Success Tips for Kids, written by Reese and Parker Haller, ages 11 and 8, will help children do just that.

101 Success Tips for Kids will help children . . . 

  • Develop self-responsibility and positive attitudes.
  • Create personal health and safety.
  • Learn useful social and interpersonal skills.
  • Create habits that promote healthy character traits.
  • Find solutions to problems and become active solution seekers.
  • Determine what they want and create plans to make it happen.

Success leaves clues. In this book it is obvious that Reese and Parker Haller have been paying attention to the clues left by the important people in their lives. Here, for the benefit of your students, they present a collection of success tips to inspire and help children become who they truly want to be.

"You don't have to wait to be a grown-up to be successful," these young authors suggest. "You can do it now!"

Reduced-price sale going on now until January 25. Two exciting offers for you to consider.

We're going to make it easy for you to put 101 Success Tips for Kids in the hands of every student in your classroom or school.


CLICK HERE TO SEE THE OFFERS.

Special Event

A NEW Training of Trainers in the Parent Talk System
June 4 - 6, 2009
Mid Kansas Community Action Program, Inc.
730 Cliff Drive
Augusta, KS

  • Do you feel called in your soul to help parents consider the possibility that there might be a better way, an enlightened way, to parent?
  • Are you interested in helping parents move from a fear- and shame-based parenting style to one that is love based?
  • Would you consider helping the parents in your community make a shift in perception that would allow them to become the change that will change our world for the better?
  • Are you ready to make a giant leap forward to actualizing your potential as a healer of the planet?  

Download the Augusta, KS, 2009 workshop brochure

Click here for more information and the Parent Talk System brochure



Product of the Month

Spirit Whisperers: Teachers Who Nourish a Child's Spirit

by Chick Moorman

Hardcover book, 220 pages ($24.95)

Do you want self-responsible learners? Do you want self-motivated students who have developed an internal standard of excellence? Do you want to help students develop an "I Can" stance toward life? Do you want to help them learn to be solution oriented and personally empowered? Do you care if your students learn about integrity, respect, honesty, sharing, acceptance, and forgiveness?


CLICK HERE TO ORDER!

Schedule of Events

Jan. 12 - Portland, OR
Motivating the Unmotivated presented by Chick Moorman, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. Contact Bureau of Education & Research (BER) at 1-800-735-3503 or www.ber.org.

Jan. 13 - Salt Lake City, UT

Motivating the Unmotivated presented by Chick Moorman, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. Contact Bureau of Education & Research (BER) at 1-800-735-3503 or www.ber.org.

 

Jan. 14 – Phoenix, AZ 

Motivating the Unmotivated presented by Chick Moorman, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. Contact Bureau of Education & Research (BER) at 1-800-735-3503 or www.ber.org.

 

Jan. 15 - El Paso, TX

Motivating the Unmotivated presented by Chick Moorman, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. Contact Bureau of Education & Research (BER) at 1-800-735-3503 or www.ber.org.

 

Jan. 16 - Denver, CO

Motivating the Unmotivated presented by Chick Moorman, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm. Contact Bureau of Education & Research (BER) at 1-800-735-3503 or www.ber.org.

 

Jan. 19 - Franklin Lakes, NJ

Motivating the Unmotivated presented by Chick Moorman, 8:30 am - 3:30 pm, Franklin Lakes Public Schools, Franklin Avenue Middle School. Contact Helen Attenello at 201-891-4433 or email attenello@franklinlakes.k12.nj.us.

 

Jan. 19 - Franklin Lakes, NJ

Parent Talk: Words That Empower, Words That Wound presented by Chick Moorman 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm, Franklin Lakes Public Schools, Franklin Avenue Middle School. Contact Helen Attenello at 201-891-4433 or email hattenello@franklinlakes.k12.nj.us.



Chick Moorman

Contact Chick at 1-877-360-1477 or e-mail him at ipp57@aol.com.


CLICK HERE TO VISIT CHICK'S WEBSITE.

Thomas Haller

Contact Thomas at 989-686-5356 or e-mail him at thomas@thomashaller.com.


CLICK HERE TO VISIT THOMAS' WEBSITE.

Links

Contact

Personal Power Press
1-877-360-1477

________________________________


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